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GNOME dataset

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posted on 14.01.2022, 10:07 authored by Wenlong Chen, Robert GrabowskiRobert Grabowski, Saurav Goel
Coastal erosion poses an urgent threat to life and property in low-lying regions. Sand nourishment is increasing used as a nature-based solution but requires significant natural resources and replenishment over time. In this study, a novel form of nourishment is explored that combines shoreface nourishment and seagrass restoration to mitigate coastal erosion (i.e. green nourishment). Using the coastal morphodynamic model Xbeach, the impact of seagrass planting on wave energy dissipation, sediment erosion and transport, and morphological evolution of a cross-shore profile was studied for mild wave conditions and an intense storm. Model results indicate that a seagrass meadow enhanced the wave energy dissipation provided by a shoreface nourishment and suggest that it may be particularly effective in sediment transport mitigation when implemented in the sheltered nearshore area. The morphological feature of the shoreface nourishment reduced the wave strength on the seagrass meadow and reduced the rate of seagrass destroyed by deposition or erosion over the grass height after storm event. Green nourishment also reduced beach foreshore erosion caused by a simulated storm event. An alternative, more cost-effective planting technique using seagrass seeds was explored, which showed similar coastal erosion protection benefits to seagrass transplants. This modelling study found that green nourishment is potentially an effective nature-based solution for coastal erosion and flooding on sandy coasts, and future studies are recommended to evaluate its morphological, ecological and flood risk reduction benefits in the field.

Funding

Improved prediction of cohesive sediment erosion based on inter-particle forces

Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

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History

Authoriser (e.g. PI/supervisor)

r.c.grabowski@cranfield.ac.uk